BirthControlThe President has insulted common sense and the Constitution all at once.  Aside from the President’s twisted sense of morality and clear intrusion on Religion, are two overlooked principles.  First is the separation of powers.  The founding fathers so feared a monarch that they divided our government’s powers into three branches.  While not necessarily equal in power, they were meant to keep each other restrained.  Unfortunately, the Executive branch, through both Republican and Democratic Presidents, has expanded its powers, virtually unchecked.  The courts, particularly the Supreme Court, have failed in their role as stewards of segregated powers.  They appear to have no problem legislating, just regulating.  Just as laws passed by Congress can be judged unconstitutional and thus null and void, so should Executive actions be subject to the same scrutiny.

The Judicial Branch has been absent from its balancing role in our check and balance system.  It is irresponsible for the Court not to have accelerated hearing Obama-Care.  Their delay has allowed/forced the Obama administration to spend millions potentially billions preparing to enforce a law that over reaches the constitutional role of government.  Likewise, President Obama’s recent mandate to dictate religious organizations to adopt his twisted sense of morality exceeds the power of the executive office.  It is the role of the Judicial Branch, as the last line of defense for the Constitution, to keep such overt power grabs by the Executive Office in check.  The Supreme Court needs to remain relevant and fast track all constitutional challenges of significance.

The second principle overlooked in the recent controversy regarding contraceptives and faith is why is the Catholic Church buying healthcare for their employees in the first place, or more broadly asked, why do employers purchase healthcare on the behalf of its employees?  Historically, employers began to offer health care when the government legislated a wage freeze during WWII, ever since the burden has shifted from the individual to the company.  It is a form of compensation, compensation much like your gross pay, compensation you never see.  In addition, companies are poor custodians for your health insurance.  When a company goes to market shopping health insurance they think nothing of your individual needs.  How can they?  They simply try to purchase the best overall coverage for the least.  This struggle between cost and coverage has lead many employers to be self insured, a nice way to say no coverage.  When companies become stressed far too often, benefits are one place they look to trim.

Also, because your employer is selecting your healthcare, they often select features that you may not want or care for.  Let’s take the item of contraceptives.  Employers like the Catholic Church may object to paying for the coverage on principle but most Americans over fifty probably also do not need the coverage (Face it, they are done.  Why pay for something you do not need.).  Resolute Principles believes that individuals should be able to purchase their own insurance with the coverage and features they desire.  If you want a plan that covers Viagra, in a free market, I am sure there will be such a plan.  Plastic surgery, acupuncture, chiropractors, why not?!  When it comes to major medical this is where some government involvement makes sense.  For more details on Resolute Principles’ health insurance philosophy see Hyperlink

Healthcare should be personal, not a mandate by the government or your employer.  It is a form of compensation, much like your gross pay, compensation you do not see. You should be given the opportunity to spend it (on healthcare) how you see fit.  Is anyone else not tired of everyone attempting to make decisions on our behalf?  A few of us are fools, but the rest of America is perfectly capable of making good decisions on our own.

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